Abstract

Farming played a role in the subsistence base for the Fremont culture, but there is no consensus as to how significant that role was. Maize is consistently found in Fremont sites, but evidence of wild plant use is also abundant. The use of both domesticates and foraged plants by the Fremont, combined with the diversity of the landscape and sites that were inhabited by the Fremont, contributes to the diversity of theories on Fremont subsistence. This thesis examines evidence for plant usage at Wolf Village, a Fremont site in Utah Valley. Wolf Village is ideally situated for a Fremont farming village. Maize, beans, and wild plant remains were all recovered in the excavation process. In order to better understand the basis of Fremont subsistence there, further research is needed, however, into the economic importance of both the domesticates and the foraged plants, how the foraged foods may have contributed to the subsistence base, and whether the foraged plants were complimentary to a farming lifestyle. The information on plant use at Wolf Village should contribute to a better understanding of Fremont subsistence.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; Anthropology

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2011-12-12

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd4919

Keywords

Native Americans, Utah, Fremont, Wolf Village, diet and plant use

Included in

Anthropology Commons

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