Abstract

Eating disorders affect millions of people in the United States alone. This study aimed to test the effectiveness of a preventative curriculum for eating disorders called Eating Disorders: Physical, Social, and Emotional Consequences, A High School Curriculum about Anorexia, Bulimia, and Compulsive Eating (EDPSEC). Participants included an experimental group of 27 students in their ninth grade health class and a control group of 21 students. The research examined the integrity of the curriculum administration and changes in participating students' attitudes and behaviors. The outcome measures used were students' scores on the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) and the Eating Survey (ES). Results indicate high treatment integrity (85%) and significant change on students' EAT-26 scores, but not students' ES scores. Students' EAT-26 and ES scores correlated highly. Although a more robust sample and wider testing of the curriculum is needed, this study indicates that a school-based preventative program can yield positive results in changing some students' attitudes toward disordered eating.

Degree

EdS

College and Department

David O. McKay School of Education; Counseling Psychology and Special Education

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2011-03-09

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd4241

Keywords

Eating Disorders, School curriculum, Prevention

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