Abstract

This design report details the development of a summer training experience for peer mentors in the Freshman Mentoring program at Brigham Young University. The purpose of the project was to develop an extended training program which would assist peer mentors in developing core mentoring skills necessary for their work with first-year students. The design of the training was informed by a number of theoretical frameworks including experiential learning, reflective practice, and narrative design. The training was evaluated using a post-then survey instrument as well as analysis of qualitative data collected from learners throughout the training. Analyses of these data suggested that peer mentors increased both their mentoring skill and confidence in providing mentoring to first-year students. This document also reports on the practical, design, and theoretical insights which emerged from the project as well as their implications for other designers who face similar design challenges. Finally, a brief discussion of the way in which the project has influenced the professional development of the designer is included.

Degree

MS

College and Department

David O. McKay School of Education; Instructional Psychology and Technology

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2011-12-06

Document Type

Selected Project

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd4859

Keywords

experiential learning, reflective practice, mentoring, skill-acquisition, identity development

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