Abstract

Everyone can agree that microblogging service Twitter makes a terrible first impression. Many will agree that this impression is an accurate assessment of many microblogging media, especially considering the narcissistic and egotistical bent that so often dominates the genre. Rhetoricians are justifiably skeptical of microblogging, especially of its rhetorical value (or lack thereof). While many rhetorical scholars have contributed to the field of digital rhetoric, the field of microblogging rhetoric is still undefined. This article examines a new kind of rhetoric exhibited by Twitter, attempting to both start the discussion about Twitter rhetoric and enter the ongoing discussion about theories of rhetoric. As Aristotelian proofs of ethos, pathos, and logos provide the foundation for modern understanding of traditional rhetoric, they will also provide the framework for this analysis of Twitter's iteration of "potential" rhetoric.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Humanities; English

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2010-06-17

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd3638

Keywords

digital rhetoric, Aristotelian proofs, Twitter, persuasion, new media

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