Abstract

This meta-analysis provided a synthesis of the research examining the relationship between the construct of ethnic identity and global well-being, variously measured. The aims of this systematic review were to ascertain the overall magnitude of the association between ethnic identity and well-being, as well as to explore the impact of moderating variables on the association. A total of 184 studies were analyzed, resulting in an omnibus effect size of r = .17, suggesting a modest but statistically significant relationship between these two constructs. Younger participants demonstrated a stronger relationship between ethnic identity and well-being. Participants in the low acculturation category demonstrated a markedly weaker relationship. Self-esteem and other well-being measures were correlated with ethnic identity, while measures of mental health symptoms were not. Therapists may benefit by recognizing the salience of ethnic identity for some clients, especially those in the adolescent age range where identity development is a critical task. However, therapists might also consider that ethnic identity is but one component of both identity and well-being; many other factors also contribute to these characteristics.

Degree

PhD

College and Department

David O. McKay School of Education; Counseling Psychology and Special Education

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2011-03-02

Document Type

Dissertation

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd4205

Keywords

ethnic identity, well-being

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