Abstract

The use of, and attitudes towards, time management among undergraduates at Brigham Young University (BYU) was examined. Data were collected using two online surveys and an electronic time log tool. The data from the surveys were analyzed using canonical correlations, multiple regressions, multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA), factor analysis, and multivariate graphical methods. Pilot survey results showed freshmen who were concerned with time management and organization had lower GPAs than those who asserted they were spontaneous and successful without time management. The main survey produced contradictory evidence, showing positive correlations for both freshmen and sophomores between GPA and students who agreed with self-descriptors that showed strong resolve for planning and structure. Time log data showed students on academic probation do not spend as much time on academic based activities as students in the control group. These findings suggest a need for further research into both BYU students' attitudes towards time management and the time use differences between high academically achieving students and students on academic probation.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; Psychology

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2011-03-07

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd4218

Keywords

time management, Brigham Young University, academic probation

Included in

Psychology Commons

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