Abstract

To date, outcome research suggests that providing clinicians with patient progress feedback and problem-solving tools is effective in improving therapeutic outcome for clients who are predicted to have a negative treatment outcome. To expand upon this body of research, the current study examined the efficacy of using these problem-solving tools (Clinical Support Tools; CST) to reduce the risk of treatment failure and enhance positive outcome with 118 clients who were not identified as at -risk for a negative outcome. Results of this study indicated that the intervention failed to lower the rate of becoming an at-risk case or to enhance treatment outcome. A possible explanation for the null results observed is poor treatment compliance. Based on the findings of this study, the CST cannot be recommended as an intervention across the broad range of clients who enter treatment. However, qualitative analysis results reflect positive indicators for continued research with at-risk cases.

Degree

PhD

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; Psychology

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2010-12-17

Document Type

Dissertation

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd4178

Keywords

treatment outcomes, treatment failure, patient deterioration, feedback, psychotherapy, quality assurance

Included in

Psychology Commons

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