Abstract

Yoga adherents claim many benefits of the practice, including promotion of bone health and prevention of osteoporosis. However, few, if any, studies have investigated whether yoga enhances bone mineral density. Furthermore, none have identified force generation in yoga. The purpose of this study is to collect ground reaction force (GRF) data on a variety of common hatha yoga postures that would be practiced in fitness centers or private studios. Twelve female and eight male volunteers performed a sequence of 28 common hatha yoga postures while ground reaction force data were collected with an AMTI strain-gauge force plate. The sequence was repeated six times. Four variables were studied: the maximum vertical GRF, the mean vertical GRF, the maximum resultant GRF, and the mean resultant GRF. Univariate analysis was used to identify mean values and standard deviations for each of the four variables. Multivariate analysis revealed some variation due to gender but none due to age or weight. Means were similar across all poses and subjects, and standard deviations were small. This unique yoga sequence produced low impact forces in both upper and lower extremities. Further research is warranted to determine whether these forces are sufficient to promote osteogenesis or maintain current bone health in yoga practitioners.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Life Sciences; Exercise Sciences

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2010-03-16

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd3492

Keywords

yoga, ground reaction force, low-impact, weight-bearing

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