Abstract

Hearing can be evaluated through the presentation of tones or speech. Speech audiometry determines an individual's speech recognition threshold and word recognition score. Traditionally these materials were developed using familiar, frequently used, monosyllabic words. Currently, there are various types of word recognition materials including those which use word lists, short half-lists, and materials which use sentences level stimuli with competing noise. Word recognition materials were first developed in Standard American English; today, materials are now readily available in many other languages. When possible, word recognition materials are developed digitally to standardize their presentation. Currently, no recorded word recognition materials are commercially available for native speakers of Samoan. Bisyllablic words were chosen, rated, recorded, and prepared for subject testing. All subjects were native speakers of Samoan with adequate hearing, meeting required standards for audiological research. Results indicated that no significant differences were found among bisyllabic word lists or half-lists developed in the current study. Subject word recognition performance and psychometric function slopes were comparable to the results of other related studies. All materials were recorded onto CD and made commercially available. It is hoped that this resource will aid trained professionals in the diagnosis and remediation of hearing loss in Samoan-speaking individuals.

Degree

MS

College and Department

David O. McKay School of Education; Communication Disorders

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2010-08-13

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd3947

Keywords

speech audiometry, word recognition, Samoan

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