Abstract

This study was conducted in order to examine two questions: 1) Does free movement while listening to classical music influence a preschooler's preference for the music?; and 2) Does free movement while listening to classical music influence a preschooler's ability to answer recognition questions relative to the music? Subjects (N = 34) were 4- to 5-year-old students from two intact classrooms at the BYU Child and Family Studies Laboratory Preschool. After being involved in six lessons utilizing two different classical pieces, each identified by a prominent instrument and experienced either Actively (with free movement) or Passively (while sitting or lying down), the students were interviewed relative to their music preferences and recognition. To strengthen the results, the process was repeated (termed Wave 1 and Wave 2) with different pieces in different experience orders.

Results of a Chi-Squared test of independence indicated no effect for Active or Passive exposure on piece preference in either wave. However, in Wave 1, pieces experienced Passively were significantly preferred to those experienced Actively, while the reverse was true in Wave 2. The Active exposure had no significant effect on the overall accuracy of recognition responses. Observational data is also included, which corroborates and extends statistical results.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Fine Arts and Communications; Music

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2010-07-13

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd3804

Keywords

preschool students, music preference, music recognition, free movement

Included in

Music Commons

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