Abstract

This thesis examines the context in which Advanced Placement (AP) English policies are made, examining the political and economic realities that impact policy decisions as well as the discipline-based critiques of the AP English program which have led many writing program administrators (WPAs) and faculty to question existing credit and placement policies. Recent efforts to dramatically expand the AP program have left many questioning whether the AP English experience actually fulfills the promises suggested by the program. After reviewing current literature relating to AP English, this thesis examines the findings of an empirical study conducted at BYU. The study evaluates the outcomes of AP English based on student writing in an actual college setting, focusing on the predictive validity of AP exam scores. Conclusions are drawn from the findings of the study and the review of literature. Recommendations are made for evaluating and designing AP policies that respond sensitively and fairly to all the stakeholders while encouraging WPAs and interested faculty to actively define the role of AP English within the college curriculum.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Humanities; English

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2004-07-16

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd508

Keywords

Advanced Placement, AP, English, composition, writing, writing program administration, educational policy, education reform, K-16, high school/college articulation, credit by examination, credit hours, curricular coherence, college composition

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