Abstract

This thesis reports on the development of a novel mass spectrometer combining image charge detection with surface induced dissociation for real-time analysis of intact viruses. Protonated viruses produced using electrospray are accelerated and subsequently impact on a solid surface. Capsid peptides released during the impact are analyzed using time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Image charge detection is used to measure the mass and charge states of structurally intact, electrosprayed viruses prior to impact. Since virus capsids are composed of loosely-bound proteins, collision of viruses with surfaces at moderate impact energies could release intact proteins. The masses and numbers of different protein types combined with the mass of the intact virus represent a unique signature useful for accurate, real-time virus identification. The progress of instrumentation developed thus far is reported. Techniques were developed for electrospraying intact viruses, including electrospray capillaries with small tips and methods for achieving complete desolvation. Significant reduction of low-frequency and other noise was achieved in the image charge detector as well as determination of accurate methods for mass and charge measurement. Improved focusing and transmission efficiency was achieved via an aerodynamic lens. Suitable surfaces were also obtained including conductive diamond and fluorinated self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surfaces.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Physical and Mathematical Sciences; Chemistry and Biochemistry

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2009-08-11

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd3153

Keywords

Virus Detection, Surface Induced Dissociation, Image Charge Detection

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