Abstract

Group therapy has been demonstrated to be effective through a number of factors. Group theorists and researchers have attempted to identify client characteristics that would enable the clinician to determine a client's appropriateness for group therapy. Reviews of research have identified client expectancies and positive and negative interpersonal skills as promising predictors of group process, outcome, and attrition. The Group Selection Questionnaire (GSQ) was created to provide clinicians with a short and useful tool to aid them in identifying potential members for therapy groups, and has shown positive preliminary results in the past. This study presents tentative support for the factor structure of the GSQ and compares the GSQ and the Group Therapy Questionnaire (GTQ), another well established pre-group selection measure. Convergent validity of the GSQ is generally supported. GSQ Demeanor, Expectancy and Total scale scores correlate significantly with the GTQ Expectations about Group scale. In addition, GSQ Participation, Expectancy and Total scale scores correlate with GTQ Interpersonal Problems, with more interpersonal problems indicating fewer positive interpersonal skills, better expectancies for group, and stronger overall group readiness. Implications of these findings are discussed as well as future research directions.

Degree

PhD

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; Psychology

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2010-07-08

Document Type

Dissertation

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd3738

Keywords

group psychotherapy, measurement, Group Selection Questionnaire, pre-group preparation, pre-group selection, expectancy, interpersonal skills, deviancy

Included in

Psychology Commons

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