Abstract

Previous studies examining withdrawal in children with language impairment (LI) have found that these children are more socially withdrawn than their typically developing peers. It seems reasonable to assume that a causal relationship exists between language deficits and withdrawal. However, there is growing evidence that different subtypes of withdrawal have varying social consequences and language may not be closely linked to each subtype. In the present study, subtests from the Comprehensive Assessment of Spoken Language (CASL; Carrow-Woolfolk, 1999) were used to evaluate specific language skills and the Teacher Behavior Rating Scale (TBRS; Hart & Robinson, 1996) was used to evaluate solitary-passive withdrawal behaviors of 34 children with LI and 34 children with typically developing language. These children were matched for age (ranging from 6;11 to 11;0) and gender. No significant difference in solitary-withdrawn behavior was found between groups of children with language impairment and children with typically developing language. There was also no significant relationship between the amount of solitary-passive withdrawal and the CASL subtest scores. The results suggest that low language ability may not be directly related to solitary-passive withdrawal. Rather, the relationship between language ability and solitary-passive withdrawal is complex and is likely influenced by other factors.

Degree

MS

College and Department

David O. McKay School of Education; Communication Disorders

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2010-04-21

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd3563

Keywords

withdrawal, solitary-passive withdrawal, language impairment

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