Abstract

As one of the major directors of Mexico's Golden Age of Cinema (1936-1956), Emilio “El Indio” Fernández (1904-1986) created films which for many came to express the official vision of Mexican identity. Part of this identity was based on the ideology of indigenismo, which posited that the pre-Columbian past held the basic kernel of Mexico's national essence while advocating the incorporation of modern Indian groups into mainstream society. El Indio's films reflect the paradox of indigenismo: praise for indigenous cultures and a simultaneous effort to make them disappear. The following study examines three of his indigenista films, Marí­a Candelaria, Rí­o Escondido, and Maclovia, to see how Fernández created representations of Mexico's indigenous populations that contributed to and deviated from indigenista policies in post-Revolutionary Mexico. This representation relies on the formation of a national myth based on a static, aestheticized Indian which incorporates all Mexicans into official state history.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Humanities; Spanish and Portuguese

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2009-08-10

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd3146

Keywords

Emilio Fernández, Gabriel Figueroa, indigenismo, Mexico, Marí­a Candelaria, Rí­o Escondido, Maclovia, myth, Indians, film, Mexican identity, art, Golden Age of Mexican Cinema

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