Abstract

For years track and field athletes have worn spiked shoes to enhance performance. This study was conducted to determine the effect of track spikes on hip, knee, and ankle peak joint moments (PJM) in collegiate and elite athletes while running. To measure differences in joint moments, ten intercollegiate and post graduate male distance runners from Brigham Young University ran at a four-minute-mile pace (6.7 m/s) across a force plate synched with infrared cameras tracking body positioning in each shoe condition. Repeated measures ANOVA (p < 0.05) revealed no significant peak joint differences between running shoes and track spikes. The minimum hip and peak knee PJM approached significance (F = 3.221, P = 0.116 and F = 2.875, P = 0.134 respectively). The high variability of joint moments between trials made it difficult to detect differences between conditions. The variability may be explained by any number of factors including: biomechanical differences in running form, running at high speeds, type of subjects, and potentially other factors.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Life Sciences; Exercise Sciences

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2009-07-15

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd3077

Keywords

Joint Moments, Spikes, Running Shoes

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