Abstract

This study evaluated after school program participation on student academic achievement as a way of helping schools meet Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) standards set by the No Child Left Behind Act. After school programs were divided into academic after school programs and traditional after school programs. Student achievement was measured through Criterion Referenced Tests in Language Arts and Mathematics. This study took place in a small urban school district located in the Intermountain West. Students in after school programs were matched with students not participating in the programs on several background characteristics including socioeconomic status, English language proficiency status, school area, race, gender, and guardianship. Hierarchical cross-classified modeling was then used to assess the impact of participation in an after school program on student test scores. This study found that participation in an after school program was associated with a decrease in Language Arts test scores and found no difference on Mathematics test scores. As well, academic after school program participants test scores were not considerably different from traditional program participants. This study shows that after school programs are not an effective way at raising student achievement and thus helping schools to meet AYP.

Degree

EdS

College and Department

David O. McKay School of Education; Counseling Psychology and Special Education

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2009-07-16

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd3093

Keywords

after school programs, standardized tests, academic achievement, Language Arts, Mathematics

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