Abstract

A Fremont site distribution model for the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument during the period A.D. 500—1050/1100 posits that the Fremont subsistence strategy (seasonal mobility with dependence on both agriculture and hunting/foraging) is reflected by a site pattern of low-investment, seasonal or short-term habitation sites and isolated storage facilities at "lowland" elevations, and high-investment, long-term residence sites at "upland" elevations (McFadden 1998, 2000). This research assesses the model to evaluate its general precision, looking particularly at its success in modeling site locations for long-term residential versus seasonal/short-term habitation sites. A database including more than 400 Fremont sites was created to evaluate the model. Data variables examined in this thesis included elevation, distance-to-water, and primary landform. Analysis of the elevation data demonstrates that the McFadden model does not fit the actual distribution of Fremont sites identified from survey. Further analysis also established that distance-to-water is not an effective variable in accurately modeling Fremont site patterning over this region. The association between functional site types and primary landforms, however, does appear to more accurately reflect site distribution as observed on the ground. Based on these results, a new model for Fremont site distribution in the upper Escalante River drainage is proposed.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; Anthropology

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2009-03-13

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd2831

Keywords

Fremont, Site Distribution, Settlement pattern model, Escalante River, Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument, Deborah Harris, Chronology

Included in

Anthropology Commons

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