Abstract

Given the numerous benefits noted in academic research from having social capital, investigators may now turn to looking at what makes a person likely to create it. In this study I examine whether building social capital in high school through participation in religious, athletic, and volunteer activities makes individuals more likely to continue to create it as adults through participation in similar activities. Using data from the National Education Longitudinal Study, I employ both multilevel and seemingly unrelated regression models. I find that early participation in religious and athletic activities increases the likelihood of doing two out of three social activities as adults, and that volunteering in high school increases the likelihood of doing all three activities in adulthood. This suggests that one way of maintaining high social capital levels in this country is by promoting teenagers' participation in religious, athletic, and especially volunteer activities while in high school.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; Sociology

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2008-08-06

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd2587

Keywords

social capital

Included in

Sociology Commons

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