Abstract

Despite the authority that time holds in the discipline of studying events of the past, not all historians or writers analyzing the past use time to study history—some use space, including writers who write about and interact with an urban topography. The space used by these writers is built space, as well as inhabited and practiced "lived" space. Whereas time provides a transparent overview of history, the urban spaces tend to be opaque. Clarifying history through urban space is additionally troublesome, because built space and its attached memories are visibly forgotten and ignored as time advances. Despite the difficulties of working with and understanding urban space, some intellectuals specifically choose space as a tool of discernment of history. For these individuals, understanding history becomes an investigation of sensing, feeling, and divining human activity out of the mass of artifacts and used spaces. Hermine Cloeter is one such urban forensic historian.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Humanities; Germanic and Slavic Languages

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2004-07-17

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd513

Keywords

Hermine Cloeter, Cloeter, hermeneutics, spatial practices, flanuer, flaneuse, female flaneur, Vienna, Wien, obscurity, illegibility, hybridity, Zwischen Gestern und Heute, Durch die engste Gasse von Wien, feuilleton, journalists, female journalist, Essayistinin, Feuilletonistinnen, Wanderungen, Spaziergehen, walking, Franz Hessel, Walter Benjamin, Neue Freie Presse, Austria, memories, urban hermeneutics, urban exegesis, urban forensics, cultural archaeology, urban cultural archaeology, bridges

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