Abstract

Bryan Tikalsky Department of Geography Master of Science Mountain water resources are essential to those living along the Salt Lake City urban corridor. Water resource planners base their policy on twentieth century climate conditions and streamflow records. Often these records only account for a small amount of the natural variability in streamflow and climate. By utilizing dendrochronology this study seeks to better understand variability of streamflow in the Jordan River Drainage Basin over the last 828 years. A GIS model was used to identify potential sampling sites where tree growth would be sensitive to climate and factors affecting stream run-off. Over eighty samples from ancient limber pine (Pinus flexilis) and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) were obtained to perform the reconstruction. Results indicate significant correlation between tree growth and streamflow. A multiple linear regression model created with tree-ring width as the predictor of October - March American Fork River streamflow explained 51.7% of streamflow variance. Analysis of the reconstruction indicates that present records do not adequately represent potential streamflow variability, and several droughts of greater severity and length occurred before the instrumental period.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; Geography

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2007-07-19

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd2028

Keywords

Climatology, Water Resources, Dendrochronology, Wasatch Mountains, Utah, Streamflow

Included in

Geography Commons

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