Abstract

Forty nine public school mental health practitioners (i.e., school counselors, school psychologists, and school social workers) completed a survey about working with dreams when counseling students. Most practitioners in this sample reported having at least one student bring up dreams during counseling and spent some time in counseling working with students' dreams. Practitioners addressed dreams more frequently in situations where the student was having troubling dreams or nightmares, and/or was dealing with death and grief. They also acknowledged working with dreams with students who were diagnosed with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, were emotionally disturbed, suffered from recurrent dreams, were depressed, and had learning disabilities. This study shows that practitioners were less likely to talk about dreams with students who had adjustment disorders, psychosis, were oppositional or ill, struggled with substance abuse problems, or had eating disorders. Furthermore, most practitioners indicated receiving no training and did not feel competent to work with children's dreams. However, most surveyed practitioners were interested in learning more about dreams in general.

Degree

EdS

College and Department

David O. McKay School of Education; Counseling Psychology and Special Education

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2007-11-13

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd2131

Keywords

dreams, counseling, children, school psychology, public schools

Share

COinS