Abstract

Two-year-olds' knowledge of gender-stereotyped tasks was assessed in an experiment that utilized the preferential looking paradigm. The looking times of toddlers' (N = 18) gazes towards gender-consistent and gender-inconsistent activities were measured and assessed. In the procedure, toddlers viewed either a male or female actor on two displays performing a masculine stereotyped activity (shaving, putting on a tie) on one screen and a feminine stereotyped activity (putting on lipstick, putting on nail-polish) on the other screen. Infants also viewed male and female actors performing gender-neutral activities (eating, drinking water) side by side in control trials. Consistent with our predictions and previous research, the toddlers looked longer at the gender-inconsistent events than the gender-consistent or gender-neutral activities. The results suggest that children have developed some knowledge of gender-stereotyped events by 24 months of age.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; Psychology

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2006-03-18

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd1226

Keywords

gender, stereotypes, childhood, development, gender-stereotypes

Included in

Psychology Commons

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