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BYU Studies Quarterly

BYU Studies Quarterly

Article Title

Ender's Game

Abstract

Orson Scott Card might well be the most versatile, and one of the most Mormon, fiction authors writing today--a true "storyteller in Zion," as suggested by the title of one collection of his essays. Though primarily known as an author of science fiction and fantasy, Card has also written historical, slice-of-life, literary, and horror fiction for print, stage, and screen, as well as a wealth of essays, reviews, and social commentary. He has been recognized for his excellence by such diverse organizations as the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA) and the Association for Mormon Letters (AML).

Yet of the hundreds of titles he has published, his most popular work by far is the science fiction novel Ender's Game. Originally published in 1977 as a novelette in Analog magazine (his first professional SF publication), Card later expanded that core story to novel length and published it in 1985 to significant popular and critical acclaim, where it won both the Hugo (fan-voted) and Nebula (author-voted) Awards for best science fiction novel of the year.

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