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BYU Studies Quarterly

BYU Studies Quarterly

Abstract

Eric d'Evegnee tells of the angst he experienced when his son expected his help in crafting a wooden car for the Cub Scout pinewood derby, his prowess as a father on the line. In the race the car wobbled across the finish line last, causing grief and feelings of betrayal for the young son. He contrasts himself with King Lear, who refused to acknowledge his failings until the very end, and d'Evegnee sees himself at peace with his children.

The authors look at creativity through the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, specifically that all people are sons and daughters of God. Our individual creative impulses are outward manifestations of our divine parentage. Much of the world's artistic media actually blinds us to our creative natures. We too often uncritically accept what is produced and made popular by the mass media, and we see ourselves as not creative unless we are successful professional artists. The authors support individual study of the forms and history of art as a foundation. They also teach that art should be shared by members of a community and that all people can contribute their art to that community. The importance of developing our individual creative capacities goes beyond professional pursuits; it lies at the very heart of each individual's potential contribution to the establishment of God's kingdom on earth.

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